this is the archive page

March is Red Cross Month

Every eight minutes, the American Red Cross brings help and hope to people in need. Whether we donate funds, donate blood or volunteer; The Red Cross depends on our support to make a difference in communities across the country.

March is Red Cross Month, and to help bring awareness, here are some facts from RedCross.org.

  • March was first proclaimed as Red Cross Month in 1943 by President Franklin D. Roosevelt as a way to raise awareness of the organization and its humanitarian mission in the midst of war. Since then, every president, including President Obama, has designated March as Red Cross Month. The American Red Cross is synonymous with helping people, and has been doing so for more than 130 years.
  • The Red Cross is not a government agency and relies on donations of time and money to carry out its vital work. An average of 91 cents of every dollar the American Red Cross spends is invested in humanitarian services and programs.
  • Clara Barton and a circle of her acquaintances founded the American Red Cross in Washington, D.C. on May 21, 1881. Barton first heard of the Swiss-inspired global Red Cross network while visiting Europe following the Civil War. Returning home, she campaigned for an American Red Cross and for ratification of the Geneva Convention protecting the war-injured, which the United States ratified in 1882.
  • Donations power the Red Cross response to nearly 70,000 disasters a year nationwide, providing shelter, food, emotional support and other necessities to those affected.
  • In 2015, the American Red Cross responded to 176 large disasters in the U.S.

To donate to the Red Cross, visit redcross.org/donate.

this is the archive page

How to Create a Kinder Mind and Eliminate Negative Self-Talk

Sometimes, we are our own worst enemies. And, negative self-talk can have a serious impact on our lives.

If you think it’s time for you to create a kinder mind for yourself, consider these tricks and tools from TinyBuddha.com.

Eliminate the words should/must do/have to.
Stop using these words and replace them with kinder words such as “I choose to.” I “Should,” “must do,” and “have to” can cause unnecessary guilt.

Smile.
Smiling has been scientifically proven to make us feel happier. Try it and see what happens!

Say yes to yourself and no to others.
Imagine if we all said yes to others only when we really felt it in our hearts. There would be no resentment, and when we do things for others it would be done with joy, creating more positive feelings about ourselves.

Accept that we don’t all have to like each other.
Just as we don’t like everyone else, everyone won’t like us, and that’s okay. You might be surprised how liberating it feels when you are okay with not being liked by everyone else.

Set achievable goals and celebrate progress.
You can celebrate your small accomplishments by going to dinner with friends or buying yourself a small gift as a reward. Whatever it is, make sure that you are present in the moment when you celebrate, as this will reinforce that you are a wonderful person and you deserve credit for all the good you do.

Walk away.
Walk away from people who don’t treat you with respect. It’s not an easy thing to do; however, if you allow others to be disrespectful toward you, then you’ll perpetuate the cycle. You deserve to be treated with love and kindness—both by yourself and others.

this is the archive page

this is the archive page

4 Ways You Can Help Others While Working Out

If you really want to pay it forward, but feel like you don’t have the time or the funds, consider this: you can actually turn your workout into a way to help those in need.

Check out these suggestions from Women’s Health (womenshealthmag.com).

Charity Miles
If you usually track your walks, runs, or bike rides on a GPS watch or app, you’ll love Charity Miles. The phone app lets you select a charity from a list to “donate” your miles to. Activate the app whenever you lace up your running shoes or hop on your bike, and exercise as usual. Then, for every mile you walk or run, corporate sponsors will donate 25 cents to your chosen charity. For every mile you ride, they’ll donate 10 cents. So the more you sweat, the more you give.

Workout Mission
This site is just what anyone trying to exercise more regularly needs. On Workout Mission (workoutmission.org) you set a minimum weekly workout goal and choose from one of five featured “missions” (think: charities like The Special Olympics or Big Brothers Big Sisters) to donate to. When you work out—whether it’s by lifting weights or doing a fitness class—you log it in the calendar. Once you complete 10 workouts, you can donate $10 to your selected mission. You’ll get a receipt for every donation you make.

Plus3
Get your entire office in on the sweaty charitable giving by using Plus3. This tool is designed to help companies motivate their employees to live healthy lifestyles through donation goals and friendly competition. You and your coworkers can download the app and sync up your fitness trackers to compete for leaderboard standing and donation goals. You’ll track your nutrition, fitness activities, and more to earn points toward prizes and donations.

Sweat for STF
She’s the First sponsors young girls around the world, and helps them gain access to education. With their #SweatforSTF campaign, you can create a fundraising page as you work toward a fitness goal, whether it’s to run a marathon or complete 100 days of yoga. You’ll set a fundraising goal and invite friends and family to make donations. When you hit your fundraising goal, you’ll be matched with a girl whose education you’ve sponsored. You can also create a fundraising page as a team and fundraise with coworkers or in memory of a shared loved one.

this is the archive page

Six Basic Needs We Have to Meet to Feel Happy and Alive

When’s the last time you took a stock check of your basic human needs? Here are six basic needs we have to meet to feel happy and alive, courtesy of TinyBuddha.com:

The need for attention
We need quality attention from the people in our lives. More and more people in the world live alone. Unless your needs are being met elsewhere, a lack of attention can lead to low self-esteem, feelings of loneliness, and a lack of connection. Join a meet up group, do an evening course, join a fitness group—anything that gets you out there and talking to like-minded people.

Mind-body connection
The way we look after ourselves physically directly impacts our psychological well-being. Feed your body good food and you’ll feel good. (That doesn’t mean pizza and wine!) Get out in the fresh air and get moving to get your serotonin and endorphin levels pumping, making you feel more alive.

Purpose and goals
Having a purpose or goal adds meaning to your life. Sign up for a 5K charity run, take up a night class, or volunteer for a local charity. Use your time to do the things you enjoy.

Connection to something greater than ourselves
A sense of connection to like-minded people or others who share your perceptions and work for a common goal is important. I chose to run one of my marathons for a homeless charity, for example. It may be being part of a group raising awareness about a shared cause, or working for an organization that shares your values.

Creativity and stimulation
Boredom and a lack of achievement can leave you feeling unsatisfied and depressed. Spending time reading about a subject that interests you, learning a new skill or craft, or doing anything that stimulates the creative part of your brain will see you feeling happier and more stimulated.

Sense of security and safety
Without a sense of security and safety you can feel anxious. You don’t have to own your home to feel secure. Security can come from having a supportive partner and family or even changing your beliefs about what security and safety mean to you.

this is the archive page

February is Heart Month

February is American Heart Month and this time around, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Million Hearts, a national effort to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes in the United States by 2017, are encouraging Americans to know their blood pressure, and if it’s high, to make control their goal. Uncontrolled high blood pressure is a leading cause of heart disease and stroke. In fact, more than 67 million Americans have high blood pressure. People with high blood pressure are 4 times more likely to die from a stroke and 3 times more likely to die from heart disease, compared to those with normal blood pressure.

High blood pressure often shows no signs or symptoms, which is why having your blood pressure checked regularly is important. It’s easy to get your blood pressure checked. You can get screened at your doctor’s office and drugstores or even check it yourself at home, using a home blood pressure monitor.

So, from now on, make control your goal!